Chic Crowd Pleaser At The Met: Impressionism, Fashion And Modernity

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Edward Degas 1882-1886

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Claude Monet 1866

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Claude Monet 1868

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Edouard Manet 1871

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Manet 1873

A great escape from the sometimes vulgar, always overpriced excesses of 21st century fashion is the current big ticket exhibit at the Met.IFM_landing From their website: “This stunning survey, anchored by many of the most celebrated works of the Impressionist era, illustrates the extent to which artists responded to the dictates of fashion between the 1860s, when admiring critics dubbed Monet’s portrait of his future wife “The Green Dress,” and the mid-1880s, when Degas capped off his famous series of milliners and Seurat pinpointed the vogue for the emphatic bustle.

Highlights of the exhibition include Monet’s Luncheon on the Grass (1865–66) and Women in the Garden (1866), Bazille’s Family Reunion (1867), Bartholomé’s In the Conservatory (circa 1881, paired with the sitter’s dress), and fifteen other key loans from the Musée d’Orsay; Monet’s Camille (1866) from the Kunsthalle, Bremen, Renoir’s Lise (Woman with Umbrella) (1867) from the Museum Folkwang, Essen, and Manet’s La Parisienne (circa 1875) from the Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, which have never before traveled to the United States; Caillebotte’s Paris Street; Rainy Day (1877) and Degas’s The Millinery Shop (circa 1882–86) from the Art Institute of Chicago; Renoir’s The Loge (1874) from The Courtauld Gallery, London; and Cassatt’s In the Loge (1878) from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

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Edgar Degas

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Albert Bartholme 1881

Alongside both masculine and feminineimpressionism_15 costumes, a full complement of period photographs and illustrations serve to vivify the ongoing dialogue between fashion and art, and afford a sense of the late nineteenth-century Parisian milieu that inspired, provoked, and nurtured the talents—and often the ambitions—of the painters of modern life.”–Metropolitan Museum Of Art, NYC

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